Monday, February 05, 2007

NEWS RELEASE

Podcast series about the Rideau Canal launched today

Ottawa, February 5, 2007 – After 175 years, the Rideau Canal has entered the digital age. With the premiere of Route Canal, a new weekly podcast series, one of eastern Ontario’s most popular recreational attractions is now a multimedia experience.

Route Canal is a weekly audio show about the canal that focuses on people, seasonal activities and, as the waterway marks its 175 anniversary in 2007, the history of the canal as well. Content of the show varies with the season, and the winter episodes will, of course, concentrate on the Skateway and Winterlude activities and events.

“The Rideau Canal is such an important part of life in Ottawa and eastern Ontario,” said series host John McKay. “Our first season will help listeners make a little bit more of their winter recreation.”

Those who download the show from podcast producer.ca over the next few weeks can expect to hear weekly updates on ice conditions, weather forecasts, Winterlude events and celebrations marking Rideau 175. Shows will also feature interviews with local historians about the canal’s rich past and points of interest along the Skateway, adding an extra dimension to that afternoon glide down the world’s longest skating rink.

“The canal played a pivotal role in the history of communities stretching from Ottawa to Kingston,” said David Rutherford, the show’s field reporter. “We’ll be talking to local historians about some of the places and events that many people pass by every day, without a second thought.”

A podcast is a radio show that is posted to the web. People can listen to it on their computers and download it to their MP3 players or cell phones. They can also subscribe to the series for free so that new episodes are downloaded to their computers automatically. The show is posted each Monday and is available by going to www.podcastproducer.ca and clicking on the Route Canal icon.

The podcast is hosted by John McKay, a freelance audio/video producer and former community television producer. David Rutherford is a former radio reporter and news editor for radio stations in Windsor and Detroit. Craig Steenburgh, the show’s announcer, is a former on-air radio broadcaster for stations in Ottawa and Smiths Falls. All three are partners in PodcastProducer.ca in Ottawa.


For more information:

John McKay
613-614-0706
mckay@podcastproducer.ca

Wednesday, November 01, 2006

PodcastProducer video podcasts for Canadian Coast Guard

PodcastProducer personnel recently traveled to Halifax to produce a series of video podcasts for the Canadian Coast Guard. The podcasts covered the Canadian - U.S. Coast Guard Summit.

See the podcasts.

Saturday, September 16, 2006

Foreign Affairs Canada Podcasts

Download feature interviews from Foreign Affairs Canada as video or audio podcasts. Get informed on foreign policy issues by watching or listening to experts any time and anywhere you want.

http://international.gc.ca/cip-pic/participate/podcast-en.asp?pm=1

The podcast is heading for the mainstream

From the Edmonton Journal:

A recent report from Nielsen Analytics found that podcasts -- online broadcasts downloaded from the Internet for playback on portable devices -- are attracting a growing number of listeners, a shift that media companies and advertisers have noted.

More than nine million Internet users in the United States downloaded podcasts to computers and mobile devices last month, the study showed. Ten per cent of the study's 1,700 respondents said they download eight or more podcasts a week, and 38 per cent of those said they listen to the radio less because they're listening to podcasts.

Full story

Podcast Q&A from Globe and Mail

Q. "So many podcasts seem amateurish. If I want to add a podcast to my site, are there ways I can add some production value to the podcast?"

A. Podcast listeners complain of 2 things - poor audio quality and boring content. To really make your podcast sound and look professional on a shoestring budget, I suggest doing these things:

1. Get a really good microphone to make your audio sound like you stepped into a studio. You can get one that plugs into the back of your computer for under $100. Record your voice with one of these and you'll bump up the audio quality of your podcast.

2. Produce a short intro with music. Every radio station has an identifier and your podcast has to as well. Hire a voice over artist to record a 10-second intro for your podcast, complete with a podsafe song (music produced by independent artists who allow others to use it for free if it's for non-commercial use).

3. Design a podcast cover. Books are judged by its cover and so too are podcasts. Design a snazzy looking image. Having one gives your podcast a leg since it helps you look more professional. Also, many people will subscribe to your podcast based on how your cover looks.

4. Plan your content and be predictable. Take some time to prepare what you'll say each week. You don't want to prepare a script and read it word for word. Instead, just write down some general points and use an outline.

Happy podcasting!

Thursday, August 31, 2006

Canadian Podcasting

Full Report
Press Release

Toronto, Ontario – July 31, 2006 - With the objective of understanding podcast growth and technology adoption in Canada, the first comprehensive podcasting survey has wrapped up and results are currently available at www.canadianpodcastlistenerssurvey.ca. Of particular note, survey findings indicate podcast listeners in Canada are almost evenly split between men and women, 59% of podcast listeners are between 25-44 years old, and the baby boomer generation is embracing podcasting at almost double the rate than those under 24.

For 77% of those surveyed, podcast is a familiar word - a compound word that combines: ‘iPod’ and ‘broadcasting,’ and according to Webster’s dictionary, is defined as “an audio file published on the Internet with an RSS feed, allowing users to subscribe to automatic downloads of a series of programs.” Moreover, of those who don’t currently listen to podcasts, 67 per cent said they would be interested in downloading one.

“Podcasting is moving away from early adopters and into the mainstream, and is no longer synonymous with young, tech-savvy men. The survey proves that podcasting appeals to the nation, whether they be young, professional or retired. Moreover, the podcasts users are downloading are just as numerous and diverse as are the podcasters themselves.” says Jen Evans, President of Sequentia Communications and co-creator of the podcasting survey.

Podcast Popularity

CanWest News ServicePublished: Friday, July 28, 2006

- The podcast is heading for the mainstream.

A recent report from Nielsen Analytics found that podcasts -- online broadcasts downloaded from the Internet for playback on portable devices -- are attracting a growing number of listeners, a shift that media companies and advertisers have noted.

More than nine million Internet users in the United States downloaded podcasts to computers and mobile devices last month, the study showed. Ten per cent of the study's 1,700 respondents said they download eight or more podcasts a week, and 38 per cent of those said they listen to the radio less because they're listening to podcasts.

The most popular podcasts -- mostly news and entertainment -- have prompted large media companies to experiment with online programming. "Advertisers go wherever there are ears and eyes, especially when you get people who are highly engaged, like podcast users," said Larry Gerbrandt, senior vice-president of Nielsen Analytics. "So many businesses are adopting it for different types of communications because it's an extremely adaptable format."